Posts Tagged ‘ Greenwood County ’

New Showing and New Video

Once again, its been a while since I made a blog entry. Its not that I’m lazy, which is always debatable. It more that I’ve been busy with a great many things.

However, today, I hung a small showing of my prints at the Lawrence Bank, located at 9th and New Hampshire in Lawrence, Ks.  Included in the show is the 20×40 inch Flint Hills triptych, “Road CR-2, Greenwood County”. Please stop by and view if you can.

Back in December, we purchased a Canon HV30 high definition video camera. I had been having yearnings to get a film movie camera, but the production costs really rack up fast, and they wind up being digital videos anyway.  The HV30 is a wonderful little camera, with capability far in excess of its diminuative size. Thus, with a few video skills under my belt, and with the aid of the editing software, I’ve created a small self-promotion video (which includes authentic Flint Hills wind in the sound track). Here it is:

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Emporia Artist Walk & Flint Hills Landscapes

I will be located in the Pyramid Pizza building, 11 East 6th, downtown Emporia. The Emporia Artist Walk is Saturday, 18 April from 10 am to 4 pm.

With me at Pyramid Pizza will be Rachel Ferrara, a finely talented up-and-coming young photographer. Rachel is Fine Arts student at Emporia State University majoring in photography. I made this video of her senior project show last January.

I finished mounting the big Flint Hills prints. Quite the project to get that big triptych mounted. The final matted size is 40×20 inches. My Emporia  Artist Walk display will feature Black & White Flint Hills landscapes from Chase County, Greenwood County, Wabaunsee County, and Geary County.

Hope to see you at the Artist Walk.

On Road CR-2, Greenwood County

On Road CR-2, Greenwood County

Near Texaco Hill, Chase County

Near Texaco Hill, Chase County

Tall Grass & Sky – Greenwood County

Tall Grass & Sky – Greenwood County   photo by Alex Hawley

Hard to believe that its been a month since I last posted. Its been busy. On Labor Day weekend, I loaded all the photo gear into the pickup and headed back to the Texico Hill area in the Kansas Flint Hills.  Went back on Road CR2 to view the area in the afternoon sun. The sky was mostly hazy but the haze cleared long enough to get this one on the 7×17 Folmer and Schwing. This one is the first in the series from that afternoon.

The more I use the 7×17, the more I like it. For what looks like a simple camera, simpler to use that the 8×10 Deardorff it would seem, the learning curve has been steep. You think after using 8×10 for several years that going to an Ultra Large Format (ULF) camera would be a breeze. Wrongo! Or, at least for me it wasn’t easy.

First, the F&S camera itself is quite literally, a hundred years old. F&S started as an independent camera maker in Rochester, NY. At the time mine was built, early 1900’s, they were owned by Eastman Kodak. Then, the Folmer Brothers patented a focal plane shutter for a 4×5 camera. Soon, the legendary Speed Graphic was born and F&S became known as the Folmer Graflex Company. The legacy of this company is still with us today, quite strongly, even though it ceased to exist nearly forty years ago. But that’s digressing from the point. A century old camera means a bellows of similar age which means never ending light leaks. Finally got that problem solved. Even though I have recoated the bellows, I still take special care to drape it with the darkcloth until I complete the exposure.

Developing the large negatives was another challenge. I thought I was smart and could use the brush development technique by inspection.  I had always developed my 810 film by inspection and didn’t think the 717 would be any different. Bought some relatively expensive hake brushes and proved to myself I could do it. Well, sort of.  Even though the negatives developed quite evenly, I was continually misreading them and underdeveloping. This sucks! Fate intervened and an old set of Beseler Unicolor drums and motor base came my way, which included a 16×20 drum.  Now I develop by time, in the daylight, and the negs come out probably better than I have ever gotten them before. Can’t say enough good things about rotary development. Uses a lot less chemicals too.

Then there was the problem of getting a contact printing frame. I quickly learned that 7×17 frames are custom built for several hundred dollars. On the other hand, 16×20 frames are plentiful and cost substantially less.  So I got a 16×20, which is four times larger and ten times heavier that the 8×10 frame I was used to. The 8×10 frame now feels like it’s for gurly-men.

So, essentially, photographing in ULF magnifies all the little gotcha problems by at least two orders of magnitude, and I haven’t even talked about having to cut down paper, loading/unloading film holders, or even purchasing film (which, let’s just call it “seasonal”). But, all those challenges withstanding, its still highly worth it.

On Road CR-2 – Flint Hills

I usually photograph during the midday period. That’s supposed to be the sweet period for B&W photographers. But when Mark Feiden e-mailed me and said “do you want to go out this evening”, I couldn’t resist. Especially when we were going to an area I hadn’t seen before.

We met in Madison. I brought along the trusty 8×10 Deardorff, the 7×17 Folmer & Schwing, a stock of film for both, and all the other paraphanelia that must accompany wooden, totally un-automated view cameras. Mark uses some very portable digital SLR equipment. My very non-portable ULF and LF gear filled the remainder of his pickup cab. Good thing it was a super cab. We headed west out of Madison. After a few short miles, we were in some of the most spectacular scenery I have ever seen anywhere. The Flint Hills at its very essence.

We were in the very northwest corner of Greenwood county, bouncing in and out of Chase county. We stopped at this spot to take our first shots of the evening. A thunderstorm was moving in from the northwest, obscuring the sun. We hoped maybe the sun would break through the clouds for a few fleeting moments of that spectacular pre-storm light, but no such luck. I found a likely spot and proceeded to set up the 7×17 while mark shot numerous frames from several angles. In the low light, my exposure was going to have to be 40 seconds. Meanwhile, Mark is racking them up. Finished the shot, disassembled and packed everything back in the truck. Off we went again, vaguely trying to get around the storm. About twenty minutes later, it caught us and we were wishing we were somewhere, not out in the open hills with rain and wind so heavy that the hood emblem is no longer visible.

“On Road CR-2, Greenwood County” is a 7×17 inch contact print made directly from a single in-camera negative. Copyright Alex Hawley 2008.