Posts Tagged ‘ contact print ’

In Morris County: New Flint Hills Landscape

In Morris County, 7x17 Contact Print

It was a busy Fall but I managed to squeeze one photo outing into the schedule. I had photographed this location before with the 8×10, but from that photo, I knew this scene was perfect for the 7×17. Not much had changed here in four years. Fortunately, the weather was good for this one day. Loaded up the trusty 7×17 into the trusty Ford Ranger pickup and off we went. The location is a few miles northeast of Strong City, Kansas.

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Featured Print

Feed Sign, Sharpe, Kansas

Feed Sign, Sharpe, Kansas

Feed Sign, Sharpe, Kansas has been one of my favorite prints. It was both fun and rewarding to make, and I think its fun to look at.

I had photographed it few weeks earlier from this instance but wasn’t quite satisfied with the print. When I went back, a small tree had grown up just to the right, casting shadows from its leaves across the sign. “Why not?” I thought.

The subject scene was extremely flat in contrast. The sign is a simple white plastic decal applied to the faded galvanized metal sheath covering. I developed the film for an N+1 time to pull as much contrast out of it as I could. It prints successfully at about a grade 3-1/2 paper contrast. All and all, an excellent exercise in B&W contrast control. It looks most lovely printed on Forte Polywarmtone paper, which is, sadly, no longer available.

This print is for sale through my Analog Photography User’s Group (APUG) Portfolio. If you are interested in buying a print, please click the Portfolio link or contact me directly.

All photographs copyright Alex Hawley

Weston’s Shells

Our merry band of intrepid photographers from the Lawrence Photo Alliance traveled to Kansas City today for a tour of the photography exhibit at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. One of the highlights of the tour for me was to see, first-hand, Edward Weston’s legendary still life “Shells“.

My remark to anyone in the vicinity was “Time to make the obligatory study of an authentic Weston”. After all, Weston is the primal Fine Art photographer, the gold standard to which all others are compared. This print, “Shells” is one of the legendary still lifes from the 1920s.

So what makes it so great? Well, for one thing, its perfect. Perfect in composition, Weston’s trademark. Its simple, which it should be. The tones and lighting are Weston’s choice for his interpretation of the form. These could be varied, but what we see is what Weston decided on. It works. I’m glad I had the opportunity to study it.

My own attempts at still life photographer have been meager, but I try. I’ve found it to be the most challenging form of subject that I’ve tried. Maybe Weston did to. Perhaps his most famous work, “Pepper #30” was reported to be his thirtieth attempt at the photograph. In this example shown below, I did ten takes before I got what I liked. And its still no Weston. (Still Life #10 taken with Polaroid Type 55 film, natural lighting).

Many Thanks to Dan Coburn for organizing and arranging the outing.

Still Life #10″ by Alex Hawley

The Texas Church Project

Some guys I know in Texas have a wonderful project going; photographing small country churches in Texas. A regional TV station just released a U-Tube video about them today. They have a very nice website too.

Although their official name is the Texas Church Project, I call them the Notorious Texas Church Gang. I hope they don’t mind. Quite an eclectic group, they range pretty far in age and backgrounds, but they are all quite good artistic photographers and have a common appreciation of the beauty that can be found in the country churches. They use a wide variety of cameras, medium, large, and ultra-large formats. Their prints are made from a variety of techniques including alt processes alike platinum/paladium. I admire them greatly.

Stop in and see the Texas Church Project gang. Don’t think you will be disapointed.

Featured Print

Yates Center Co-Op

Yates Center Co-Op

Yates Center Co-Op

Yates Center Co-Op has been my most successful print to date. It was the first photograph of mine that was published. Happily, it was published in the February 2005 issue of the prestigious B&W Magazine. Right after I joined Flikr last year, it was chosen for and featured in the Film is Not Dead, it Just Smells Funny blog.

I have life-long love of these old grain elevators. Each one is so unique. They are nearly extinct. So much so that a few have been designated as historic sights. This one is still in business and in daily use in Yates Center, Kansas.

The print is a genuine 8×10 contact print made from an in-camera 8×10 negative. I still have several prints made on Kodak’s legendary Azo paper, which is also now extinct. It was taken in February 2004 using my 8×10 Deardorff field camera with 12 inch Kodak Commercial Ektar lens.

This print is for sale through my Analog Photography User’s Group (APUG) Porfolio. If you are interested in buying a print, please click the Portfolio link or contact me directly.